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The acid caused bird brain damage, or at the least, created confusion, dizzyness and seizures.


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The acid had possibly come from leaky domestic septic tanks in the area rather than from suspected farm fertilizers. But the film cannot solely be interpreted in a scientific manner, because as the actors in the film discover in the long discussion scene in the Tides Restaurant, there is no solid, rational reason why the birds are attacking. They are not seeking revenge for nature's mistreatment, or foreshadowing doomsday, and they don't represent God's punishment for humankind's evil.

When this is understood, the symbolic film's complex fabric makes more sense, especially if interpreted in Freudian terms.

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It is about three needy women literally 'birds' - and a fourth from a younger generation - each flocking around and vying for varying degrees of affection and attention from the sole, emotionally-cold male lead, and the fragile tensions, anxieties and unpredictable relations between them.

The attacks are mysteriously related to the mother and son relationship in the film - anger and fears of abandonment or being left lonely of the jealous, initially hostile mother come to the surface surface when her bachelor son brings home an attractive young woman. Curiously, the first attack has symbolic phallic undertones - it occurs when the man and woman approach toward each other outside the restaurant in the coastal town. On an allegorical level, the birds in the film are the physical embodiment and exteriorization of unleashed, disturbing, shattering forces that threaten all of humanity those threatened in the film include schoolchildren, a defenseless farmer, bystanders, a schoolteacher, etc.

In a broader, more universal sense, the stability of the home and natural world environment, symbolized by broken teacups at the domestic level, is in jeopardy and becoming disordered when people cannot 'see' the dangers gathering nearby, and cannot adequately protect themselves from violence behind transparent windows, telephone booths, eyeglasses, or facades. Numerous allusions to blindness are sprinkled throughout the film the farmer's eyes are pecked out, the children play blindman's bluff at the birthday party, the broken glasses of the fleeing schoolchild, etc.

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The film commences on a white background, as dark black, silhouetted bird-shapes rush through and destroy the robin's egg-blue credits as they appear, accompanied by upsetting noises of screeching flapping sounds and bird cries. The action of the film occurs over a five-day period, from a Friday through a Tuesday morning. She passes a newstand with a poster of the city's landmark, the Golden Gate Bridge. After hearing a sexist 'wolf-whistle' [or more appropriately, a bird-whistle! However, one look upward and she becomes uneasy as she sees ominous, menacing swarms of seagulls beginning to darken the sky.

On her way into the Davidson's Pet Shop, she passes an exiting customer [Alfred Hitchcock himself in his customary cameo] being guided and pulled along by a pair of terriers [Hitchcock's own dogs Geoffrey and Stanley] on leashes.

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Inside the shop, caged birds in ornamental cages are screeching and cheeping. On the upstairs second floor where the squawking increases in volume, Melanie Daniels Tippi Hedren asks the fussy shopkeeper Mrs. MacGruder Ruth McDevitt about the phenomenon she witnessed outside:. Melanie: Have you ever seen so many gulls? What do you suppose it is? MacGruder: Well, there must be a storm at sea. That can drive them inland, you know. We have to get them from India when they're just baby chicks You'll have to teach him to talk. As she writes down her address, a handsome, virile, bachelor attorney named Mitch Brenner Rod Taylor [Mitch's name recalls the director's own name, Hitch] bounds up the shop's stairs and mistakes Melanie for a salesclerk: "I wonder if you could help me?

He flirts back and inquires about lovebirds [and the human varieties of 'birds'], specifying his need for birds that are neither too "demonstrative" or "aloof" - "just friendly":. Melanie: Lovebirds, sir? Mitch: Yes, I understand there are different varieties. Is that true? Melanie: Oh yes there are.

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Mitch: Well, these are for my sister, for her birthday see, and uh, as she's only going to be eleven, I, I wouldn't want a pair of birds that were too demonstrative. Melanie: I understand completely. Mitch: At the same time, I wouldn't want them to be too aloof either. Melanie: No, of course not. Mitch: Do you happen to have a pair of birds that are just friendly?

The playgirl walks around the store searching for a cage containing lovebirds, but he demonstrates that he is more of an expert: "Those are canaries. She counters, explaining how chaos sexual would be unleashed upon the orderly world if they were released - besides, birds have always been caged, eaten, shot, and abused throughout human history:. Mitch: Doesn't this make you feel awful Melanie: Well, we can't just let them fly around the shop, you know.


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Mitch: No, I suppose not. Is there an ornithological reason for keeping them in separate cages? Melanie: Well certainly, it's to protect the species. Similarly, I thought the ending where Bullock and the children discover a sanctuary in the woods that was formerly a school for the blind was a nice finale, if not a bit cutesy, but it works and I was genuinely not expecting a happy ending in a film like this. I also imagine this movie might work better as a book which it is , given some of the onscreen issues I mentioned earlier. But overall, would I recommend it?

Yeah sure, why not. I write about video games, television, movies and the internet. News and opinion about video games, television, movies and the internet. Share to facebook Share to twitter Share to linkedin. Bird Box Netflix. From metacritic. Film Night.